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From: Paul Allen Panks 
Subject: Commodore Magazine FAQ V2.0 out! :)
Date: Wednesday, April 29, 1998 2:51 PM

Hi-

It's been close to 2 and half years since I last updated the Commodore
Magazine FAQ, so here is version 2.0, updated on 4/29/98.

Enjoy!  :)

Regards,

Paul Allen Panks
dunric@yahoo.com

!---Begin FAQ 2.0---!

Okay,  folks. Here it  is.  I present to  you:

THE COMMODORE MAGAZINE FAQ 2.0 (4/29/98)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE: The information contained within these pages is believed to be 
correct and free from error. However, due to typos or other 
misinformation regarding this subject that may or may not appear, I,  
Paul Allen Panks,  take full responsibility for such errors and promise 
to correct them as necessary.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CONTENTS:

1.0  -  AHOY! MAGAZINE  (background,history,etc.)
1.1  -  Run-down of Articles featured in  AHOY!
1.2  -  People who contributed to AHOY!
1.3  -  Misc. Information
1.4  -  Frequently Asked Questions about  AHOY!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.0  Ahoy!  Magazine: Background,History,etc.

Ahoy! magazine began publishing with the January 1984 issue. The  
publisher  was Ion International, of New York City. Published monthly, 
this magazine began its coverage of the Commodore 64 and Vic-20 
computers. 

Ahoy!'s main focus was on feature articles involving the Commodore 
community, as well as infrequent How-to articles that exposed such 
information as the Vic and 64 Operating System, the "New" Commodore 128, 
and, later, the Amiga line of computers from Commodore.

The magazine published "Type-in" programs every issue, with varying degrees 
of scope and interest. Utilities  and Games appeared most often in the 
pages of  Ahoy!, with occasional Comol-related programs. The  majority of 
programs offered by Ahoy! could easily be typed in by the average user. 
BASIC and Machine Language were the most common  format.  Two programs, 
Bug Repellent and Flankspeed, where provided every issue to ensure 
mistake-proof entry of the programs (this was NOT the case in the first 
couple of issues, however).

Ahoy! began coverage of the Commodore 128 in early 1985, and had  phased 
out  Vic-20 coverage almost completely  by the end the year.  Amiga 
coverage started late in 1985 and eventually made it's way into the pages 
of another separate Ahoy!-led publication, Ahoy!'s AmigaUser, which 
started with the first issue being May 1988 (and last, April 1989).

Ahoy! managed a number of colorful and experienced personalities 
throughout its five years of publication. Publisher David Schnieder 
was responsible for the publication of the magazine,  and others 
such as David Allikas (Editor-in-Chief) helped with magazine layout and 
development.  Part time staff members like Morton Kevelson (Consulting 
Editor) and Dale Ruport (Consulting Editor) provided articles which 
focused on technical aspects of Commodore computing. Other freelance 
writers and programmers whose services endowed the pages of Ahoy! 
included: Bob Blackmer, Cleveland M. Blakemore, Buck Childress,  Arnie 
Katz, Gordon F. Wheat, Tony Brantner, Orson Scott Card, among others.

Ahoy! magazine ceased publication with the January 1989 issue, mainly due 
to financial difficulties with the publisher, and a change in direction 
with the Commodore community. Ahoy! evidently realized that people were 
slowly moving on to other (read: Greener Pastures) computers.

1.1 - Common Articles w/ a  brief explanation of each

Ahoy!'s content was always fresh and varied from issue to issue, yet 
many  of their usual columns provided the reader with a sense of comfort 
and normalcy.

Listed below is a complete list of columns which appeared  in Ahoy! and a 
brief explanation of what they were all about.

1. A View From the Bridge

This was undoubtedly one of the very first pages the reader turned to 
after  picking up  a copy  of a  current issue of Ahoy!. More than just a 
preview of the  magazines contents,  this editorial page provided 
colorful insight into the happenings at Ahoy!, and their  views on the 
Commodore community at-large.  The ideas and views expressed were done so 
in a sometimes comical fashion, with hidden subtleties every so often.

"A View From the Bridge" also served as a sort  of announcements  page 
for upcoming events. Also, occasionally  a shortened version of "Errata" 
would grace these pages.

From time to time,  a little  cartoon would show up. Often it would focus 
on current events in the  Commodore community, but more often than that 
computers and life in general. Occasionally, these cartoons  made their 
way to other, more secluded pages of the  magazine as well.  This was a 
delightful surprise to the reader who expected to read an article 
on, say, RAM expansion and upon  doing so discovered a funny cartoon   
and caption that made him/her chuckle.

2.  Scuttlebutt

Primarily a column devoted exclusively to News related  to  the Commodore 
community, it also provided to the reader an opportunity to  find out 
about upcoming products and/or  software.

Occasionally, this column would be extended when CES rolled around each 
December and June, and coverage would focus primarily on products and 
software showcased at the respective shows.

3.  Art Gallery

Another column that was found quite frequently in the pages of Ahoy!,  
this was a forum for readers to submit their best computer-generated 
artwork to the magazine, sort of a  L'Voure in a magazine if you  will.  
Much of  the artwork submitted was done so on commercial art programs, 
such as Koala and Doodle!.

Readers' whose artwork appeared in the magazine were rewarded with a 
one-year subscription to Ahoy! magazine and/or Ahoy!'s Disk Magazine. 
Any Commodore computer was a candidate for reader submitted artwork, 
including the Amiga, much to the dismay of Commodore 64/128 users.

4.  Commodares

A column provided to the reader to intentionally rack his/her brains, 
reader submitted "answers"  in the form of BASIC  or Comol programs to 
"problems" submitted by other readers was  the primary focus of  this 
column. Problems such as finding the least common denominator were 
answered by a variety of readers, the best  answers of which appeared in 
Commodares. This column also helped the reader to develop his/her 
programming skills while at the  same time helping them with increasing  
their logic and problem-solving abilities.

5.  Flotsam

This column was a place for readers to express their opinions, gripes, 
congratulatory remarks, etc.  to Ahoy!  and its full time staff. Often 
the magazine made a special effort only to include letters of praise 
(but then again, RUN magazine was guilty of this as well),  but also 
included letters that pointed out room for improvements. 

6.  Amiga Section

A column exclusively devoted to Commodore  Amiga coverage, this was met  
with some dissatisfaction from Commodore 64/128 users who wanted the 
magazine to retain it's Commodore 64/128 user-only  focus. However, 
Ahoy!  realized that NOT ALL Commodore Users were 64/128  owners, and 
that some owned  Amigas as well. So a compromise was made. This section 
covered the latest software and hardware releases, and was expanded to 
include specific Amiga machines as well.

After awhile, Ahoy! then decided  to provide a  separate magazine devoted 
exclusively to Amiga users. They named the magazine "Ahoy!'s AmigaUsers". 
To accommodate  both audiences, Ahoy! made yet another compromise: 
publish the AmigaUser every other month,  with a total of four issues a 
year. Ahoy! was reduced to eight. However, the AmigaUser ceased after the 
April 1989 issue. (Anyone know why they made this change?)

7. Errata

This column reported bugs  in previous issues, especially  in  the 
"Type-in" programs listed every issue. Often they were minor bugs, but  
sometimes the daisy wheel printers that Ahoy!  used garbled some programs 
so badly that much of the program  was reprinted. Thusly, the Errata  
column became that much more important. NOTE: Ahoy! also maintained a 
bulletin board system which the user could log onto at  300 baud and get 
the latest program and article  corrections without waiting a month or so 
for  a correction to bee printed in a following issue.

8. Rupert's  Report

This  column provided the intermediate to  advanced reader with  a course 
in technical programming and construction. Projects ranged from building a 
home-made Speech Synthesizer (using Radio Shack-stock products,  of  
course) to Building  an 80 column adapter for the 1701  and 1702 monitors.

Often  a program was included that helped to  support what Dale  Ruport  
was attempting to explain in his column. Though not  too technical, this 
column was sometimes above some readers'  heads  (mine included, I was 12 
at the time :) ). Otherwise, this was a welcome addition to the magazine.

9. Tips  & Tricks

This column included general hints, how-to's,tips, and programming 
shortcuts that made life easier on the everyday Commodore user. Often  
the focus was on speeding up BASIC, ML programs that provided a  useful 
tool when programming, or just general, time-saving routines.

A payment was made to each reader-submitted "tip", often in the range of 
$10-$30.

10. Commodore Roots

This  column focused on assembly  language programming, like Comol for 
instance. Other focuses included connecting the RS-232 interface to 
another computer (like the IBM, for  instance), and even an article on the 
mysterious Shadow Registers (Dale Rupert elaborated  on this in the 
January 1987 issue of Ahoy!)

OTHER FREQUENT COLUMNS  OR ARTICLES:

11. Game Programming (How to Program your Own Games)

This was  rather frequent from 1984 until 1986. Orson Scott Card 
provided inside information on such varied topics as game design, sprite 
graphics, even SID music. 

"How to Program your Own Games" ceased after 1986, and was subsequently 
replaced. Cleveland M. Blakemore's three part series on "Programming 
your Own Text Adventures" began with the June 1988 issue, continued with 
the July 1988 issue, but never reached a third installment: Mr. 
Blakemore left the magazine before he could finish his work.

12. S.O.S.

This column was useful in its day, and it was a shame that Ahoy! 
discontinued it after Tim Little left for Electronic Arts  in October
1987. Mostly, this column answered reader-submitted  questions on a   
varieyt of topics, including specific programming questions, general  
computing questions, and other topics.

It was never really replaced due to Ahoy!'s desire to keep the magazine's 
length  to a respectable minimum, thus reducing publication costs. 
Larger  magazine sizes were more common in the early  stages of Ahoy!, 
mainly because the Commodore  community at the time needed and assuredly 
demanded such attention.

1.2 - CONTRIBUTORS

As mentioned in Section 1.0  of this FAQ,  Ahoy! was blessed with  a 
colorful and experienced staff throughout it's five years of publication.
Among the regular  contributors  to Ahoy!:

David Schnieder  (Publisher)
David Allikas (Editor/Editor-in-Chief)
Tim Little (Senior Editor)  -- and later
                                Cleveland M. Blakemore (Senior Editor)
Dale Ruport (Technical Editor)
Morton Kevelson (Consulting Editor)
Arnie Katz (Entertainment Editor)
Buck Childress (Consulting Editor)
Orson Scott Card (Freelance Writer)
Bob Blackmer  (Freelance Writer)
Mike Hoyt  (Free Lance Writer)
Tony Brantner (Free  Lance Writer)
Gordon  F. Wheat (Free Lance Writer)

There  are many others not mentioned above who submitted less frequently. 
Hats off to them as well.

1.3 - MISC. INFORMATION -

1. Feature Articles - Centered around such topics as "Can the 64 crack 
the Peanut?" in the January 1984  issue (#1) to "Fractal Recreations" in 
the January 1989 issue (#61).
2. Type-in  Programs - Some in  BASIC, some in ML. The  BASIC listings 
were accompanied by  a checksum code printed in the right margins in  
reverse white, making them very visible when printed on the grey-colored 
"Program Listings" pages. Bug Repellent (listed in every issue but the 
first four) helped the reader type-in BASIC listings without mistakes 
(thus the checksum in the right margins). Flankspeed (listed in every 
issue after 2/85), allowed readers to enter in  Machine Language 
programs. The ML listings were in a modified Hexadecimal format, with a  
combination  of letters and numbers, which were double-digit in length 
and spanned a total of 8 double-digit  columns plus a checksum at the 
very end of each line.
3. The Front Cover of Ahoy! was represented by  a half dozen  or so 
little TV  screens that presented to the reader the contents of the 
current issue (this began with Issue #7). On the bottom,  two hands of a 
mysterious Commodore 64  user tapped diligently away at the keyboard. 
History Buffs NOTE: The "old-style" Commodore 64 unit and accompanying 
1541 disk drive  were always shown, along with  an unidentified Commodore 
printer (possibly the MPS  801?). A Styrofoam cup of hot  coffee sat by 
the  keyboard  on the right hand side.
4. Photographs accompanying the articles of "Type-in Programs" featured 
in Ahoy! were usually taken  courtesy of David Allikas, the 
Editor-in-Chief of Ahoy! magazine.

1.4 - Frequently Asked Questions About Ahoy!  Magazine

People have often asked me where they might  obtain a few back issues to 
Ahoy! magazine. Unfortunately, Ahoy!'s circulation never reached more 
than 250,000 at any  one time, so some magazine issues may be hard to 
come by these days.  When Ahoy!  initially ceased publication, they 
offered to their readers back issues to make  up for any  issues  
outstanding on their subscription.

Ahoy! also included a  "slip" every issue that allowed the reader to 
order back issues for $4.00 an issue, plus the obvious shipping and 
handling charges.

However, once they stopped publishing, this feature disappeared.

The best place to obtain back issues of Ahoy! these days is to hit 
garage sales and flea markets  as much as possible. Even try contacting 
computer  outlets and stores which carry or support  older systems (like 
the Commodore 64, for instance :)  )

Another  question I  frequently get is, why  didn't Ahoy! become more 
popular than it's  competitors?

I can answer that briefly:

Ahoy!'s problem lay mainly in the fact that their distributor had 
difficulties circulating the magazine. However,  the problem
was not with the publisher of the magazine...they did a fantastic  
job. Incidentally, the magazine enjoyed more success in such places
as Australia and New Zealand than North America (go figure).

Also, it seems that the Commodore community ignored Ahoy! because there 
was RUN and Compute!'s Gazette to turn to first, as they often did. Ahoy! 
was a distant third in the circulation  figures,  thus  did not  enjoy 
the popularity it  so evidently deserved.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, this completes this edition of the Commodore Magazine FAQ v2.0
(1/4).
Look for another addition in about a month or so.
Reprint editions are available from this newsgroup or  from me:
Paul  Allen Panks
E-mail:  dunric@yahoo.com


 --
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This signature file was brought to you by Paul Panks, not Micro$oft, IBM, 
or any of those other money-sapping, machine-wasting companies bent on
world 
domination. Did you here that Micro$oft wants to purchase the Catholic 
Church? I don't think Bill Gates would make a very good choir boy. I think 
its time to put our foots down and stop this maniac before he declares his 
campaign for the Presidency!
*** Check out Jim Brain's WWW Page at: Http://www.msen.com/~brain/ ***
(You'll be glad you did!)
E-mail: dunric@yahoo.com
"If you quote me on this, I'll have to deny it. Besides, my memory is 
*terrible*. I forget things often. Also, my memory is *horrible*."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, folks. Here it is. I present to you:

PART TWO OF THE COMMODORE MAGAZINE FAQ 2.0 (4/29/98)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE: The information contained within these pages is believed to be 
correct and free from error. However, due to typos or other 
misinformation regarding this subject that may or may not appear, I,  
Paul Allen Panks, take full responsibility for such errors and promise to 
correct them as necessary.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CONTENTS:

1.0  - RUN MAGAZINE  (background,history,etc.)
1.1  - Run-down of Articles featured in  RUN
1.2  - People who contributed to RUN
1.3  - Misc. Information
1.4  - Frequently Asked Questions about  RUN

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.0  Run Magazine: Background,History,etc.

Run magazine began publishing with the January 1984 issue. The publisher 
was IDGE Communications. Published monthly, this magazine began its 
coverage of the Commodore 64 and Vic-20 computers.

Run's main focus was on feature articles involving the Commodore 
community, as well as frequent "How-to" articles that revealed such 
information as the Commodore 64 and 128D's Operating System ("A guided 
tour of the Commodore 64 and 128D Computers" December 1988), the 1581 
Disk Drive ("Become a Power User" June/July 1990), and, later, CMD's new 
FD-4000 series of 3.5" Disk drives ("FD-4000 Series" November/December 
1992). 

Run published Type-in programs every issue, with varying degrees of scope 
and interest. Utilities and Games appeared most often in the pages of 
RUN, with occasional ML programs in the form of Basic Loaders. The 
majority of programs offered by RUN could easily be typed in by the 
average user. BASIC and Machine Language were the most common format.  
A single program, RUN Checksum, was provided every issue to ensure 
mistake-proof entry of the programs (it was later updated to  
accomodate the Basic Loader programs).

RUN began coverage of the Commodore Plus/4 in late 1984, and added the 
Commodore 128 in the fall of 1985. Incidentally, RUN never really covered 
the Amiga line of computers very much, with maybe an infrequent article 
on some distantly related Amiga-subject.

RUN's staff over the years was blessed with expertise in every facet of 
Commodore computing. Editor-in-chief Dennis Brisson helped with such 
duties as editorials, magazine layout, and development. Tim Walsh added 
technical expertise, as well as occasional additions to RUN's "Magic" 
column, a magazine staple for all eight years that RUN was published. 
Staff members such as Lou Wallace and (later) Ellen Rule provided 
assistance with questions in "Commodore Clinic", while other programmers' 
such as Mark Jordan (128 Mode) provided specialty articles. Other 
freelance writers and programmers who services endowed the pages of RUN 
included: John D. Rockefeller, Tony Brantner, Arnie Katz, Joey Latimer, 
John Ryan, among others.

RUN magazine started going to a bi-monthly format after the April 1990 
issue. Starting in that same year, RUN provided to its readers Classified 
Ads. These Ads allowed the readers to benefit from frequent discounts of 
Commodore hardware and software. RUN ceased publication with the 
November/December 1992 issue. 

1.1 - Common Articles w/ a brief explanation of each

1. RUNinning Remulations

This was undoubtedly one of the very first pages the reader turned to 
after picking up a copy of a current issue of RUN. More than just an 
editorial, this popular column was a forum for the staff at RUN to 
express their continuing support for the Commodore community, as well as 
focus on current issues in the personal computing market. Well written, 
concise prose made this column a joy to read.

2. NEWS and New Products

Primarily a column devoted exclusively to News related to the Commodore 
community, it also provided to the reader an opportunity to find out 
about upcoming products and/or software.

Occasionally, this column would be extended when CES rolled around each 
December and June, and coverage would focus primarily on products and 
software showcased at the respective shows.

3. Magic Column

This was RUN's bread and butter, so to speak. Even more legendary was the 
Special Issue at the end of each year, with over 100 never before 
published "Tips & Tricks" from the previous year. Also, many never before 
published Games & Utilities were showcased in these issues.

4. Mega Magic

This column was sort of a spin-off from the "Magic" column, but its scope 
was much more centralized. Each issue (until February 1989), this column 
provided to its readers a "super" Magic Trick, usually of great value to
the reader, but too long to publish in the regular "Magic" column.

5. Software Gallery

RUN always had an unusual grading scale for Game reviews:
A. Excellent! A worthy addition to your software library!
B. Pretty Good.
c. Average, but worth having.
D. Needs work
E. Horrid! Should be deep-sixed!

Nevertheless, RUN's reviews were often quite generous, and only on rare 
occasions would a game warrant a "D" or below ("Willow" comes to mind as
one such game).

6. Commodore Clinic

This column served as a forum for readers to have their questions about 
Commodore computing answered by knowledgeable experts. Often the question 
was as simple as "Q: How do I turn on my C-64?", and thusly some answers 
were as simple as "A: You flip the little black switch on the side of the 
computer." Of course, most questions were complex and required a great 
deal of thought. But Lou Wallace (and later, Ellen Rule) were up to most 
tasks.

7. 128 Mode

This column was an addition from the defunct-Commodore Magazine, which 
merged with RUN after the October 1989 issue. It's primary focus was 
dealing with the Commodore 128 in its "native" mode. Topics covered ranged 
from programming sound to exploring the mysteries of the PUDEF command.

8. Gold Mine

Yet another addition from Commodore Magazine, this column provided 
"cheats" to its readers on many of the recent games of the day (and some 
not so recent). This helped out those frustrated with certain games, and 
even an occasional POKE would all that would be needed to give the player 
infinite lives.

9. GEOS/Telecommunications Workshop

This regular column focused on GEOS, the Graphic Environment Operating 
System for Commodore 64/128 users. Breakthroughs such as using the 512K 
RAM expansion unit from GEOS as a "virtual" disk drive, and others such  
as programming GEOS to display color in 80-columns were constant  
additions to this often overlooked column.

OTHER FREQUENT ARTICLES OR COLUMNS:

10. Run Amok

This column made corrections to previous issues, especially in the 
type-in programs. Occasionally, this column would also make corrections 
to articles with misinformation as well.

11. RUN Classifieds

This frequent "column" allowed RUN readers to shop for inexpensive 
hardware and software. Often the items were like-new, refurbished, or 
used, but the reader was still getting an outstanding bargain for the 
money. 

12. How-to Type-in Programs from RUN

This column accompanied the RUN Checksum program in every issue. It 
explained in detail the special Commodore character set and graphics, and 
how to correctly type them in. This was mostly for new readers, but also 
served as an important reminder for veterans.

1.2 - CONTRIBUTORS

As mentioned in Section 1.0 of this FAQ, RUN was blessed with a colorful 
and experienced staff throughout it's eight years of publication. Among 
the regular contributors to RUN:

Dennis Brisson (Editor/Editor-in-Chief)
Tim Walsh (Technical Editor)
Lou Wallace (Consulting Editor) -- and later
                                    Ellen Rule (Consulting Editor)
John Ryan (Freelance Writer)
Tony Branter (Freelance Writer)
John D. Rockefeller (Freelance Writer)
Arnie Katz (Freelance Writer)

There are many others not mentioned above who submitted less frequently. 
Hats off to them as well.

1.3 - MISC. INFORMATION -

1. People complained about the length of RUN Paint (March 1989), and 
indeed it was quite long. In fact, it was so long that a couple of 
readers submitted "Magic" tricks that redefined a couple of keys on the 
keyboard to make entering the DATA statements in RUN Paint less of a pain.
2. Front Cover - Varied from issue to issue, but the constant remained 
the name of the magazine, RUN, in the form of keys that spelled the 
magazine's name. History Buffs NOTE: This practice of using keys to 
represent RUN's name ceased after the June 1987 issue, after which a more 
stylized version of RUN (in italicized type lettering with rounded 
edges) was used until the magazine ceased publication in 1992.
3. # of Pages - Again, this varied from issue to issue as well. However, 
after the February 1989 issue, the number of pages dwindled to a low of 
48 pages by the September/October 1992 issue. According to RUNning 
Remulations, this was due to the summer months and how during these 
months advertisements were less frequent. While there was certainly some 
truth to that statement, the real reason centered around the fact that 
the Commodore 8-bit community was being abandoned very quickly by the 
same advertisers who dwindled in number every other issue, hence the 
lessening of pages in RUN.
4. MAGIC Column - Each new "Magic" trick was denoted a machine language 
prefix such as: $461A. This was done to differentiate programs from one 
another.
5. Type-in Programs - All in BASIC, with some in the form of a BASIC 
Loader which poked the ML into memory. The later created a file on disk, 
after which the information was POKEd into memory, and then saved to disk 
in the form of an ML file. The reader then loaded the program and typed 
'RUN' as if it were a BASIC program. The DATA statements in the BASIC 
loader were in Hexadecimal format. They were not separated by commas; 
rather, by an asterisk and/or a space in the middle of each line of
ML code.

1.4 - Frequently Asked Questions About RUN Magazine

People have frequently asked me why RUN chose to use a BASIC Loader 
instead of just plain ML Code like in other magazines. According to RUN, 
their method was not only faster than other magazines, but also consumed 
less space as well. This is debatable, of course, but one would have to 
believe RUN in the case of RUN Paint and others.

Also, people have asked me why RUN chose to go to a bi-monthly format in 
1990. This change, I believe, was due to the fact that RUN wanted less of 
a lead time between issues, therefore making each issue fresh and consistent
with the time of year. This also helped in the coverage of CES and other 
Commodore-related shows.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, this completes this edition of the Commodore Magazine FAQ v2.0
(2/4).
Look for another addition in about a month or so.
Reprint editions are available from this newsgroup or from me:
Paul Allen Panks
E-mail: dunric@yahoo.com


 --
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This signature file was brought to you by Paul Panks, not Micro$oft, IBM, 
or any of those other money-sapping, machine-wasting companies bent on
world 
domination. Did you here that Micro$oft wants to purchase the Catholic 
Church? I don't think Bill Gates would make a very good choir boy. I think 
its time to put our foots down and stop this maniac before he declares his 
campaign for the Presidency!
*** Check out Jim Brain's WWW Page at: Http://www.msen.com/~brain/ ***
(You'll be glad you did!)
E-mail: ppanks@hotmail.com

"If you quote me on this, I'll have to deny it. Besides, my memory is 
*terrible*. I forget things often. Also, my memory is *horrible*."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------






--
--
********************************************************************************

          Few cats act their age, while most just cough up fur balls.

********************************************************************************
  • Ok, folks. After much delay, here it is. I present to you the (Modified):
  • COMMODORE MAGAZINE FAQ (3/4) V1.0 - COMPUTE!'s GAZETTE
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • NOTE: The format for this FAQ will be different than previous ones. To conform to standards already in place, I have updated this format in a question and answer session (i.e. 1.0 What was Compute!'s Gazette?). Also note: The information contained within this edition of the (3/4) FAQ is believed to be entirely correct and free from error. However, due to typos and/or misinformation on my part, some misinformation may appear. I promise the reader(s) to update this FAQ upon reader-submitted and/or self-corrected submissions as necessary. Enjoy the FAQ!
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • CONTENTS:
  • 3.0 - What was Compute!'s Gazette? (i.e. Background,history,etc.)
  • 3.1 - What articles appeared in Compute!'s Gazette?
  • 3.2 - Who was responsible for contributions to Compute!'s Gazette?
  • 3.3 - What other information should I know about Compute!'s Gazette?
  • 3.4 - Where can I obtain back issues to Compute!'s Gazette? (And other questions...)
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • 3.0 - What was Compute!'s Gazette?
  • Compute!'s Gazette was a monthly publication put out by Compute! Publications in conjunction with the ABC Publishing Company. The Gazette originally started in July 1983 as a spinoff from the regular Compute! magazine, this was done to accomadate the growing number of Vic-20 and 64 owners. The full time staff of Compute! just did not have enough time to handle ALL the computers covered (i.e. Atari 400/800,Vic-20 & 64,IBM PC).
  • Compute!'s Gazette, more than any other Commodore-specific magazine, was easily read by the average reader in clear, easy-to-understand terminology and language. This worked against Compute!'s Gazette in its later days, as the general reader audience matured somewhat are realized that CG was merely candy-coating everything and not adequately telling things "how they are".
  • Nevertheless, the Gazette began in July 1983 covering the Vic-20 and Commodore 64 computers. A welcome feature was extensive coverage of CES (Consumer Electronics Show) every January and June. The Gazette changed its focus with the February 1985 issue to "COMMODORE" users, not just Vic-20 and 64 coverage exclusively. As the Vic-20 wained in popularity, coverage of it diminished, while newer computers (such as the Plus/4,16,and 128) received more attention.
  • The content of the magazine became repetitive after awhile, and readers probably no doubt grew tired of it. Re-releases of "old" programs as "new" hardly added to the quality of the magazine. In earlier years, the Gazette's quality was much better than later on.
  • Compute!'s Gazette ceased publication as an individual entity and merged with Compute! as a separate magazine "within" a magazine from 1990-1993. Afterwards, the Gazette continued in its disk format and ceased in February 1995.
  • 3.1 - What articles were in Compute!'s Gazette?
  • The Gazette in its early years (1983-1986) was broken down in these categories:
  • ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     FEATURES
  • ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     The Move Toward Integrated Software  Selby Bateman ..............26 *
  •     Inside View: Bruce Artwick, The Designer r etc. Kathy Yakal ......32 *
  •  A window to the world: Modems in the Home  Sharon DArling .......38 * ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     REVIEWS
  • ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     Seven Cities of Gold  Gregg Keizer ..............................98 64
  •     Childpace  C. Regena ...........................................104 64
  •     Also Worth Noting ..............................................110 * ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     GAMES
  • ______________________________________________________________________________
  •     Trap 'Em  Jon Rhees .............................................54 V/64
  •  Chomper  George Hu ..............................................56 V/64
  •  Kablam!  Stephen Ressler ........................................60 V/64
  • [snip] [etc etc etc]
  • The above example was given from the January 1985 issue (Vol. 3, No.1) Below everything was printed:
  • *=General, V=VIC-20,64=Commodore 64, +4=Plus/4, 16=Commodore 16.
  • And later was added:
  • 128=Commodore 128.
  • Thus the numbers and asterisk following each page number. Other departments etc. included Education/Home
  • Applications,Programming,Departments,and Program Listings.
  • Here is a breakdown of the many features and articles in a typical issue of the Gazette:
  • 1. Features
  • These articles where the main "theme" if you will of each issue. THe focal point and main topic addressed. The bar above the title "Compute!'s GAZETTE" on the front page (in the above example of the TOC, "The Move Toward Integrated Software") would often be one of the "Features" articles.
  • Also included from time to time would be an interview with a software designer behind a successful game or utility (hence the feature column "Inside View: etc.").
  • Also, if the CES was covered, it would appear in the "Features" area as well. CES coverage was extensive and well-written.
  • 2. Reviews
  • Often the latest software and games were covered this column, but hardware also from time to time. In general, the Gazette made an effort to candy-coat reviews, but were for the most part reliable and fair.
  • 3. Games
  • This section included Type-in programs for various Commodore computers in the form of exciting games. Examples of such include "Enchanted Journey" (May 1985/Vic-20 only),"Power Poker" (November 1985/64 only), and Nevets (April 1984/64 & Vic-20).
  • Occasionally, games would be included with "how-to" projects, such as adding a second-joystick to the Vic-20 (Tank Mania,April 1984/Vic-20).
  • 4. Education/Home Applications
  • Sometimes articles for general audiences would appear, other times educational type-in programs. Examples of this included "Math Dungeon" (January 1985/Vic & 64), Stars II (August 1989/64), and "Ardvark" (October 1983/Vic-20).
  • These articles and programs were useful for teaching the younger readers about computers, and educating parents about the various features and aides available for their kids.
  • 5.-Programming
  • VARIOUS articles and programs appeared in this section. Occasional programs (such as "Disk Merge",January 1985/Vic-20 & 64) would appear, other times regular articles are programs provided monthly installments to the reader ("Power BASIC",Hints & Tips,Machihine Language for BEginners,BASIC Magic, The Beginners Corner,etc.)
  • Most of these programs and articles provided short, useful information and routines for everyday use in programming,home applications,software,etc.
  • 6. Departments
  • The Editor's Notes (Robert C. Lock and later, Lance Elko) was were the editor expressed his views on various issues concerning the Commodore community, and sometimes served as a sort of announcements page for the magazine.
  • Gazette Feedback (Editors and Readers) was a question and answer forum supplied by the readers and answered by the editors of the magazine.
  • Simple Answers to Common Questions (Tom R. Halfhill) was a column that answered everyday questions submitted by the reader. More in depth than Gazette Feedback, and more specific too.
  • Horizons: 64 (later became Horizons- Charles Brannon) was a column that delved into a number of topics and interests, general and specific.
  • News & Products - was a column that let the reader know about new developments and products available in the Commodore community.
  • D'iversions (Fred D'Ignazio) - a later column much like Horizons, but even more specific in scope and interest. Sometimes a "theme" would reoccur every so often, from issue to issue.
  • Other articles in "Departments" that appeared less frequently:
  • Bug-Swatter: Modifications & Corrections - This infrequent column provided corrections and suggested modifications from programs and articles in previous issues of the Gazette.
  • User Group Update - A useful column that provided to the reader a list of user groups throughout the country and in local areas.
  • 3.2 - Who was responsible for contributing to Compute!'s Gazette?
  • Lots of people. Here is a list:
  • (1983-1987 or so)
  • Publisher - Gary R. Ingersoll
  • Editor in Chief - Robert C. Lock
  • Director of Administration - Alice S. Wolfe
  • Senior Editor - Richard Mansfield
  • Maganaging Editor - Kathleen Martinek
  • Editor - Lance Elko
  • Assistant Editor - Todd Heimarck
  • Production Director - Tony Roberts
  • (1987-1993 or so)
  • Publisher  - William Tynan
  • Associate Publisher - Lance Elko
  • Managing Editor - Kathleen Martinek
  • Editorial Operations Director - Tony Roberts
  • Senior Art Director - Janice R. Fary
  • Editorial Marketing Manager - Caroline D. Hanlon
  • Executive Assistant - Sybil Agee
  • Senior Administrative Assistant - Julia Fleming
  • There are others who contributed less frequently to the Gazette. Amoung them Charles Brannon,Selby Bateman,Kathy Yakal,Sharon Darling,Gregg Keizer,C. Regena,Fred D'Ignazio,Michael S. Tomczyk,William A. Yarberry, Jr.,Richard MansfieldLawrence Cotton,Tom R. Halfhill,Robert Simms, aoung others.
  • Others not mentioned...hats off to them as well.
  • 3.3/3.4 - Other Frequently Asked Questions about Compute!'s Gazette
  • Where can I obtain back issues to the Gazette?
  • You may still be able to obtain back issues by writing the publisher directly. They are cleaning out old inventory and want to get rid of some of the back issues remaining. Here is there snail-mail address:
  • ABC Consumer Magazines, Inc.
  • c/o Robert G. Burton,President
  • 825 Seventh Avenue
  • New York, NY 10019
  • This is the address as listed in the August 1989 issue of the Gazette. It may have changed since then. I will post a revision to this FAQ should that be the case.
  • Otherwise, hit as many garage sales as possible.
  • What was the distribution numbers for the magazine?
  • The circulation numbers for SUBSCRIBERS ONLY reached about 80,000 on its best years. TOTAL circulation may have been as high as 90,000.
  • Why did the magazine cease publication?
  • A number of reasons, many of them financially interrelated with the Commodore 8-bit market in general. With the waning popularity of the C-64/128 line of 8-bit computers, subscription numbers dwindled. Thus, the Gazette was forced to wither lower its standards to less articles and programs per issue ( and less pages per issue ) or fold. They chose the later.
  • ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Well, this does it for this edition of the (3/4) Compute's Gazette FAQ. Look for another edition (4/4) that will cover ALL Commodore magazines not previously mentioned (as much as bandwidth and space limitations will allow)
  • Re-prints editions of this FAQ are available from this newsgroup, or by e-mailing me at:
  • dunric@yahoo.com
  • Paul Allen Panks
  • --
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